Taranto NJ

Date: 
01/01/2006
Investigation Line: 

Abstract

Anti-native DNA antibodies can be detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay with Crithidia luciliae, displaying an annular image due to a kinetoplast containing double stranded DNA. Other structures such as membrane, flagellum and basal corpuscle can be stained as well, showing what is called atypical fluorescent images. As C. luciliae belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family, which include the human pathogens Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp., it was considered that these atypical images could be caused by cross-reactions. Serological studies for Chagas' disease were performed in 105 serum samples displaying atypical images. Sixty four percent of the samples from non endemic and 78.3% from endemic areas for Chagas' disease showed fluorescence in both, membrane and flagellum (joint image). Fifty samples from normal blood donors and 57 samples from patients with conective tissue diseases were tested with C. luciliae. None of them presented the joint image except for two patients with lupus who were also chagasic. In addition, 54 samples from chagasic patients were studied and all of them presented the joint image. We also studied 46 samples from patients with leishmaniasis from whom 28 were coinfected with T. cruzi. The joint image was observed in 88.0% of the samples with leishmaniasis and in 89.3% of the co-infected samples. The results suggest that C. luciliae could be used as an economical, and of low risk, alternative substrate for the serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease, even though it does not discriminate for Leishmania spp. infection. This study also suggests that whenever atypical images are observed in C. luciliae during the search for anti-DNA antibodies, it would be convenient to submit the patient to clinical and serological tests for the diagnosis of leishmaniosis and Chagas' disease.

Date: 
01/01/2004
Investigation Line: 

Abstract

Migration of HIV infected individuals from cities to small towns and rural areas spreads AIDS among non urban population, superimposing HIV with other endemic or epidemic infections as parasitoses. This situation is a big challenge to public health because in most cases the association between these infections worsens both prognoses. We present here the first case in Argentina of AIDS associated to a mucocutaneous form of American tegumentary leishmaniasis. The patient was from Orán, an area where in the middle eighties, an epidemic outbreak took place. By now more than 2000 cases have been parasitologically confirmed in our Institute and the causing species were identified as Leishmania (V.) braziliensis and L. (L.) amasonensis. Considering the existence of co-infection of HIV and Leishmania, it is recommended that in patients from endemic areas with records of cutaneous or mucocutaneous ulcers, even healed, leishmaniasis must be investigated, among other diseases.

Date: 
01/09/2003
Investigation Line: 

Abstract

In a study, carried out in 2000, of the clinical and parasitological status of a Wichi Aboriginal community living in the suburbs of Tartagal, northern Salta, Argentina, 154 individuals were screened for parasitic infections. Ninety-five faecal samples were also obtained from the same population. Ninety-three percent of the subjects were positive for 1 or more of the parasites investigated by direct test and 70.5% of them had parasitic superinfection. The most frequent helminths were Strongyloides stercoralis (50.5%) and hookworm (47.4%). We found low reinfection rates and a long reinfection period after treatment and provision of safe water and sanitation. Serum reactivity of these patients was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect immunofluorescent assay and 22.1% of them had anti-Toxocara antibodies, 16.2% were positive for a complex antigen of Leishmania braziliensis, 29.9% were positive for a complex Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, and 17.5% were positive for a specific Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, Ag 163B6/cruzipain.

Date: 
01/07/2000
Investigation Line: 

Abstract

The objective of the present study is to describe two cases of dogs with mucocutaneous lesions caused by Leishmania spp. Both dogs presented destruction of the nasal septum, hyperemia with soft palate edema and barking alteration due to laryngeal compromise. Biopsies were taken from the lesion border and Leishmania spp. amastigotes were seen in the imprints. The dogs presented positive serology when complex soluble antigen from Leishmania mexicana was used. One of the dogs was also suspected to be infected by Trypanosoma cruzi as suggested by its positive reaction with a purified specific antigen, Ag163B6-cruzipain. Most of the studies concerning leishmaniosis in dogs have described the cutaneous form of this disease in close association with human cases of Leishmania infection instead of the mucocutaneous form described herein. The presence of dogs with mucocutaneous leishmaniosis alerts on an increase of the prevalence of this form in humans, which can cause deforming lesions, alterations of the speech and even an inadequate nutrition due to difficulties in deglutition.

Date: 
01/01/2000
Investigation Line: 

Abstract

Toxocara canis and Ancylostoma spp. are geohelmints that parasites dogs and can eventually affect humans, mainly children, causing visceral and cutaneous larva migrans respectively, constituting a serious public health problem. This study was carried out in two towns located in the xerophilous forest Chaco salteño where humans live closely with many animals, including dogs. Hematological values and anti-Toxocara canis antibodies, determined by ELISA in serum, were evaluated in 98 children from this area. Thirty-six children presented with eosinophilia of 10% or higher in peripheral blood. Twenty out of 98 (20.4%) children had antibodies against antigen from L2 larvae of Toxocara canis. A high percentage (55.6%) of the children with eosinophilia presented anti-Toxocara canis antibodies. Nine children had multiple serpiginous lesions typical of cutaneous larva migrans. Feces from dogs were collected in the area where children lived, in order to search for parasite contamination. Three different techniques of stool examination were employed and eggs were counted. Out of the 106 feces examined, parasites were found in 82 samples (77.4%). Ancylostoma spp eggs were found in 74 (69.8%) samples and eggs from Toxocara canis were found in 19 (17.2%). The average number of T. canis and Ancylostoma spp eggs/gr of feces, were 200 and 3,871 respectively. Giardia spp (14.5%), Trichuris vulpis (7.6%), Genus Endamoeba (2.8%) and Taenia spp (1.9%) were also identified in the stools. Sanitary control and health education in order to control these parasitoses are emphasized.

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